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Discussion and news for parents and the broad community
Here is a new resource for 2017, managed by Sightlines Initiative's 'Parents in Dialogue' group.
It is a connection point for parents and families keen to support our visions for education, to learn together, to signpost resources, campaigns and much more! The initial contributor...s will be myself, Viviana Fiorentino, with Helen Beale and Lottie Child (plus occasionally Robin.) We look forward to the exchanges and making the changes in education about which we are so passionate.
Viviana Fiorentino, Diary Editor
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Whose Education Is It Anyway?

Here we are- Easter time! ...

...the celebration of spring, new life, growth, energy, possibilities …life, exuberance, energy! 

However, in the worlds of education, we have …. More proposals for testing – and cuts – and educators leaving – and cauldrons of stress ladled out free and with seconds to all on the receiving end. Joy! Policymakers are spinning tests and conjuring new measuring devices as if their lives and careers depended on it – how industrious they are. And lucky us! We Will be told – and efficiently, too. More joy.


Put up, shut up or get out?

Of course myriads of children - and parents – and educators- feel quite differently about how things actually should be – and many are raising voices, taking on this 'other' stick-wielding point of view, trying to make a difference:sometimes by instinct (surely this is not good?), sometimes by experience and knowledge (the observant educator and parent). And some are simply trying to get through the day, or find ways to run away or otherwise survive it all (this is often the lot of the children.)Significantly increasing numbers of parents have been taking the 'get out' option, not seeing any alternative amidst the onslaught of regimes of testing, and going for home-schooling.

During Easter weekend the main educators' union in the UK have been convening and discussing how to protect education against yet more 'high-stakes testing' which is about to be pronounced upon four-year-olds by the UK government. It has been wondered whether the policy-politicians behind all of this have ever been children? Maybe not – that would explain much. But maybe they have been – in which case there is hope.

Commenting on the BBC this week on the government's 'high stakes testing' approach to education, the internationally-renowned educator Professor Sir Ken Robinson cogently outlined the damaging path which education is being pushed down. Do take two minutes to listen to the interview here.

For decades and decades now, educators have been striving to make the case for education which enables, enlivens, connects. Often we've been working and doing this amongst ourselves – which is great and necessary. But this rather leaves parents out on a limb, with varying degrees of disquiet or unhappiness which can simply feel unfathomable, or lead to decisions such as simply keeping their children away from the whole sorry mess. Rather latterly we've realised that 'our information' needs sharing and discussing broadly – that examples of lived, exciting education needs sharing, that aspirations for what education could actually be need blazoning in public spaces. Parents are the potential partners in this re-making of such a basic public good. 

In Sightlines Initiative network we feel the urgent need to share how, what, why we work, to give substance to 'an education of the possible' (Loris Malaguzzi, founder-educator of Reggio's educational approach.) We work to engage in our ideas with parents, with the local communities, bringing alive through film, visual and written documentation the exciting learning of children, engaged in deep learning when we manage to keep the fetters off, and give good time, space and attention to what we offer in 'the classroom.'There are many examples on our website and in publications. And colleagues are doing this internationally: we are learning how to connect.

You, Your Child, and School

Ken Robinson has also been considering how to inform and support parents: he has a new book to which he refers in his interview. It is very timely in the work of spreading a broad cultural vision for enlivening education. Here's an extract from his introduction:

"Education is sometimes thought of as a preparation for what happens when your child leaves school-getting a good job or going on to higher education. There's a sense in which that's true, but childhood is not a rehearsal. Your children are living their lives now with their own feelings, thoughts, and relationships. Education has to engage with them in the here and now, just as you do as a parent. Who your children become and what they go on to do in the future has everything to do with the experiences they have in the present. If your children have a narrow education, they may not discover the talents and interests that could enrich their lives in the present and inspire their futures beyond school.
I hope [that this book] will be useful in three ways.

  • The first is by looking at the sort of education your children need these days and how it relates to your roles as a parent. The world is changing so quickly now that education has to change too.
  • The second is by looking at the challenges you face in helping them get that education. Some of those challenges have to do with public policies for education and some more generally with the times we live in.
  • The third is by looking at your options and power as a parent to overcome these challenges."

You can read more of it here; and you can view Ken Robinson 's own video introduction here

We recommend it to all who are striving to envision and empower a broad vision for education and the wellbeing of the children who are and will experience it.

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1461 Hits

Would you like to be a trustee of our charity?

CHILDREN ARE CURIOUS, CREATIVE, AND PLAYFUL EXPLORERS –
every parent and teacher knows this, at some level: the challenge is to make education fit for these creative learners.

At Sightlines we know this and our vision is for all children to get the chance to be just that – children, who are eager and willing learners and explorers. We want to give them the best start possible – not crush them in to a system that only has one size for all: in the phrase of the advocacy organisation to which we belong: children are more than a score.

We are an independent national organisation promoting an educational approach in primary and early childhood education which works to our children's creative and inquisitive dispositions.

We are seeking new Trustees of our charitable body, to help us: we are seeking three individuals to join, in being part of this.

We particularly welcome application from individuals from outside of education – yes, with the same shared passion of course, but perhaps with complementary expertise.

Areas of expertise which we think would be beneficial include Communication; Social Networking; Change Movement work; Advocacy; Business/Cultural Networks; Community Action – these are ideas though, not an exclusive list.

We are committed to a new additional direction in our work – the informing and motivating of our nation's parents, grandparents, and all wellwishers of children's lives. Our children – your children – could right now be offered educational experiences and schools which they want to eagerly rush to first thing in the morning. The climate of education needs to change, for the sakes of all of us: educators and parents need to work together to do this. The one can't do it without the other. We at Sightlines can demonstrate how education can be, but this needs championing broadly. (We have discovered that, as a group, politicians cannot lead a change of direction – they are preoccupied by fears about their own jobs, toeing the line, short-term actions, and 'economic returns.' They need the reassurance of a groundswell for change.) Could you be part of this new vision?

Click here to read more.

  • Email or call Director Robin Duckett to discuss further: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. | 0191 261 7666
  • Please pass on to any friends/colleagues you also think may be interested.
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627 Hits

“What’s so funny ‘bout peace, love and understanding?”

As I walk through  This wicked world  Searchin' for light in the darkness of insanity  I ask myself  Is all hope lost?  Is there only pain and hatred, and misery?  And each time I feel like this inside, There's one thing I wanna know: What's so funny 'bout peace love & understanding?  (Nick Lowe) 

We live in a world where basic life necessities are threatened, many people see their rights violated, betrayed. Terrorist attacks undermine daily life, instilling a progressively higher fear of living - if you become afraid of going to the restaurant, taking the metro, or going to a concert, then you have become afraid of living. Sometimes we feel we are facing a 'struggle' that corrodes our ability to really understand who/what/if we have to defend ourselves from, and how. But it seems fundamentally clear and important to me that despite information and politics that encourage us to feel that we are in a 'war', assuming and instilling a 'defending attitude', we have to keep firm to our values. We must prioritise the constructing of common values and principles through peace and solidarity. As parents or educators, we have the responsibility to resist to any war, take the side of living in peace, and embrace solidarity, equality, and justice.

This beautiful video of the International Centre Loris Malaguzzi shows what 'Peace' means in the words of children. Working to change education gives a chance to stay firm in our ideals and more importantly spread out a message of optimism, a culture based on common rights, respects, empathy, welcoming, and involvement in building a new knowledge of the world around us. These values are the base of an education through which adults and children can create a marvellous understanding of each others and build up a complete humanity where people take care of the 'rights of others', sweeping away the fear of living. 

Dr. Jacqui Cousins (educator and founder of Global Children and Eco-Angels) highlights the necessity and importance of listening to children today, in a new article written for Sightlines Initiative. She recalls to us the radical changes that can be made to the attitudes, spirits and well being of very distressed children when we listen to them and remove the unnecessary and damaging pressures.

Continue reading
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